close

A*DESK has been offering since 2002 contents about criticism and contemporary art. A*DESK has become consolidated thanks to all those who have believed in the project, all those who have followed us, debating, participating and collaborating. Many people have collaborated with A*DESK, and continue to do so. Their efforts, knowledge and belief in the project are what make it grow internationally. At A*DESK we have also generated work for over one hundred professionals in culture, from small collaborations with reviews and classes, to more prolonged and intense collaborations.

At A*DESK we believe in the need for free and universal access to culture and knowledge. We want to carry on being independent, remaining open to more ideas and opinions. If you believe in A*DESK, we need your backing to be able to continue. You can now participate in the project by supporting it. You can choose how much you want to contribute to the project.

You can decide how much you want to bring to the project.

Magazine

17 October 2022
The Transcendental Drop An animated interview with Carolina Jiménez

Fito Conesa - Carolina Jiménez

“We are strange beings dancing on a dying planet.” C. Bayo

That dancing unites us and brings us closer to a synesthetic/spiritual/communal place is obvious, and that the feeling of belonging and consensus in a Rave can be more powerful than the converging/equalizing power of democracy is also obvious, but in these days in which Rave culture has been absorbed by the late-capitalist winds of the pandemic, once the era of the domestic-party-pandemic-virtual has passed I think it is more conciliatory and mentally more healthy to give a twist to the phrase of Chimo, “The Apocalypse is Others.” Surely in this way we can dodge the immobilizing feeling of guilt and enter into some kind of action.

Agitprop and bad press turned any hint or possibility of utopia or new structure into a mere joke or anecdote, or into a subculture movement to be analyzed by the elite, just another anthropological phenomenon.

At the very beginning of 2021, Jon Hopkins published Music For Psychedelic Therapy, a journey/meditation that offers us sounds that take us back to the days of Alice Coltrane (always in all my phrases) and Sun Ra. No Ketamine. A full-fledged meditation, like what my friend Alba offers me when I go to visit her, with a few extra decibels and breaths.

It is not accidental and, in fact, seen from a distance, or at least the distance of year one A.C. (After Covid) and its temporary limbo, that suddenly catharsis or the need to dispense with certain ideas/pressures will lead us to recover discarded strategies, ways of inhabiting the world that place us directly in the Other.

As someone who embraces and deal with their (sometimes better or worse handled) intensities, Jon Hopkins’ tracks, rainstick and all, don’t repel me, not entirely. Dancing with tears in our eyes should be the title of every party night, taking into account that we’ve decided to continue walking with the same speed and strut once the stone was removed from the road.

The words of the curator Carolina Jiménez sparkled on the horizon, like the small invisible specks or muscae volitantes with which us myopic people live daily.

The political dimension, resilient and de-structuring, was always there.

Its thoughts explode like micro aurora borealis, as capricious as they are set in their ways. Another possible path.

In a conversation built from voice messages, I ask certain questions, which in reality are a mixture of curiosity and hope, or at least the certainty of a horizon.

(Images: Bego Solís. Lou Drago, Suspending Time: Meditations for accessing alternate space/time in music)

Fito Conesa is an artist and programmer. With a degree in Fine Arts from the UB, he teaches and develops workshops, conceptualizes and produces visual and sound works and curates exhibitions. He was director of the project Habitació 1418 at MACBA and CCCB and was part of the tutorial team of the Sala d'Art Jove in Barcelona. www.fitoconesa.org

Carolina Jiménez is a curator and researcher. She lives and works in Barcelona, where she combines her freelance and institutional work, coordinating now the research and knowledge transfer area of Hangar. When she can, she writes for catalogs and publications.

Articles

17 October 2022

The Transcendental Drop

Media Partners:

close
close
close
"A desk is a dangerous place from which to watch the world" (John Le Carré)